New adventures with the “Argon Collective”

In March 2019, I shared my advice for the Argon crew. By April 2019, I became part of that crew. Considering it now, I made the decision when I wrote that advice.

I didn’t just want to support this boat and crew, I wanted to be a part of it. As Calla, my partner-in-crime in many things, said, “If you care about something, if you want to support it, you put some fucking dollars behind it.” So I bought into Argon (with Calla) and now have two boats I think about, do projects on and most importantly, SAIL!

In 2019, Argon enjoyed a fresh coat of bottom paint, new varnish, some overnights and lots of evening sails.

So, what is the “Argon Collective“? It’s both nothing new but also something different. Boat co-ops have existed before but since this one has attracted some attention, I wrote about it for 48° North.

The issue also featured our dear friend Jeanne on the cover (aboard Argon) and my perspective as a woman on the water (page 40). I loved reading other perspectives and articles from women in boating but that one magazine issue only scratched the surface.

In the two months since that article was published, the Argon crew has come together for a wedding, several moves, finishing boat projects and of course, as many sails as we could squeeze in before the days became too short. We’ve been together for important moments, big and small and had a lot of fucking fun. That’s what keeps me coming back to the “Argon Collective.”

The Argon crew celebrating at Sam & Charlie’s wonderful and windy wedding!

Also since the September issue came out, we’ve heard from some big supporters and some big skeptics about our style and women in sailing. Of course, I’m disappointed to hear anything negative about something that brings us all such joy.

I am eager to continue the conversation about women in sailing and any kind of boating because our experience won’t change with one conversation, one magazine issue or one article. Most women in boating also have families, are in relationships, and pursue careers. That means that at any given time, we might be fighting for equality on several different fronts.

Argon’s first night sail during the full moon and first time rigging up the spinnaker!

After the Argon article, I received some amazing emails from women eager not only to sail more but to sail with more positive people. How can we ensure more people have a positive experience sailing? That’s been the challenge since I started teaching sailing and has only become more and more important.

I’m sure people have wondered about my decision to buy into Argon. Why didn’t I stay on the sidelines? Remain a coach or observer? Again, Calla said it best: “I didn’t just want to make a cameo as a helper, I wanted to be involved with something that amazing.”

Sailing on Argon has been amazing and I hope you’ll read our story…to date.

The Argon Collective

Going sailing starts with a decision. A decision to learn to sail, to join a crew or to buy a boat–so many choices lead you down the dock. Sometimes you don’t even realize you’re making that decision.

The morning after I agreed to buy into a partnership for Argon, a 1979 San Juan 24, I was hungover and second-guessing myself. The combination made me feel like I had a pit in my stomach.

Continue reading at 48north.com.

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